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Fuck yeah plant sex!

adambatchelor:

Sex: The Masterpiece of Nature
Raffles Pitcher-Plant (Nepenthes rafflesiana) x Icelandic Poppy(Papaver nudicaule)
A somewhat crude and unusual encounter between two geographically and behaviourally different plants, one native to sub-polar regions of the North, whilst beautiful and lightly fragrant, all parts of this plant are considered poisonous. The other, a slightly carnivorous, exotic and threatened plant from South East Asia, feeds on the gooey soluble nutrients of fallen insects actually has many properties beneficial to humans, the roots can treat stomach aches and dysentery and the stem may be used to treat coughs and fevers.
libutron:

Creeping Fuchsia - Fuchsia procumbens
Fuchsia procumbens (Myrtales - Onagraceae) is a species native to New Zealand naturally uncommon and is the smallest fuchsia in the world. It is strictly a coastal species found on sandy, gravelly or rocky places near the sea in the North Island.
The flowers are unusual for a fuchsia in that they are upright and yellow in color with red anthers and blue pollen. The flowers occur in September - May followed by edible red berries in early winter.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2010)
flowerfood:

マスデバリア・ウェヌスタ/Masdevallia venusta by nobuflickr on Flickr.
libutron:

Axinaea cf. lehmannii
The Melastomataceae are the seventh largest family of flowering plants. They are liberally distributed throughout tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. They are particularly notable for their diversity of hair types and modifications of the androecium (stamens). An example of such floral modification is Axinaea lehmannii (pictured), a densely branched, South American tree, about 5 m tall, whose flowers have reddish petals.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Andreas Kay | Locality: Otavalo, Imbabura, Ecuador (2012)
libutron:

The Elephant yam - A striking aroid used as food, fodder and medical
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Alismatales - Araceae) is a large aroid, which is found throughout Asia. In the wild it is ruderal in habit and grows in a very wide range of moist, semi-shaded to open, secondary and disturbed forests, shrublands, scrubs and grasslands. It is also cultivated as an ornamental for its striking compound foliage and unusual and dramatic flowering and fruiting structures.
The plant produces a single inflorescence (flowering spike) crowned with a bulbous maroon knob and encircled by a fleshy maroon and green-blotched bract. After the growing season, this dies back to an underground storage organ (tuber).
Commonly known as Elephant yam, it is one of the staple food plants of tropical Asia, and is extensively cultivated for its edible tubers, which are the third most important carbohydrate source after rice and maize in Indonesia. They are also consumed widely in India and Sri Lanka, although elsewhere they are seen as a famine crop, to be used when more popular staples, such as rice, are in short supply.
Elephant yam has medicinal properties and is used in many Ayurvedic (traditional Hindu) preparations. Severals studies have been done on the properties of this plant. Several experimental studies have been done on the properties of this plant, showing that tuber extract has real antioxidant activity and inhibition of hepatic cell proliferation in cancer, however this has only been proven in experimental protocols with mice.
Other common names: Elephant foot yam, Whitespot giant arum, Stink lily, Telinga potato.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©tpholland | Locality: cultivated - Par, England, UK (2012)

wnycradiolab:

huntingtonlibrary:

Here’s what’s been happening with the Corpse Flower over the past six days. Getting closer to bloom time!

OMG SUSPENSE!

(via teratocybernetics)

wnycradiolab:

huntingtonlibrary:

Here’s what’s been happening with the Corpse Flower over the past six days. Getting closer to bloom time!

OMG SUSPENSE!

(via teratocybernetics)